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Archive for May, 2016
87662f71c032c50632bb111cc91cc593-huge-leAs team-based models of primary care become more prevalent, you may encounter health care professionals you've never heard of before.  For example, what's a health coach?  Here -- in a post from our archives -- is an explanation from C. Leigh Goldsmith, who was a health coach at Iora Health's Collective Primary Care in Brooklyn, NY.

By C. Leigh Goldsmith

The patient tracking system lights up my laptop with “WAITING.”  I head out to the waiting room to meet “Angela” with a smile and a handshake.  She stands up from the sleek gray couch. Light streams into this magnificent space that is so rare in New York.  Angela has red pixie hair and thick black hipster glasses covering pensive eyes.  She gives me a smile, big but sad. 
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Posted by Sonya Collins on May 26, 2016 11:36 AM EDT
adde7675af24249cb43282150ef6d77a-huge-khHere on the blog, we've been taking a closer look at team-based care. This psychology student learned that crucial members of the care team were right outside her door. Here she explains the value of team-based care and integrating behavioral health into primary care. 

By Linda Khatib

I treated “Tina” in an intensive outpatient program for psychological services. She was one of many patients I have treated who struggled with countless comorbid chronic conditions, both physical and mental. Specifically, Tina struggled to cope with bipolar disorder, diabetes and obesity.
 
Throughout the course of treatment, I tried my best to provide her with the greatest care possible, but I felt helpless because psychological treatment was not enough. I was able to help Tina recognize and acknowledge her maladaptive eating behaviors. We also worked together to gain a better understanding of her addiction to food, which was due to underlying traumatic experiences she faced during her upbringing. Although she was able to reach this pivotal point in therapy, I felt she needed more to see improvements in her overall life. One of her goals was to lose weight and better manage her diet, so I searched for a nutritionist who would see Tina to further address her diet needs and help her choose healthier foods. In addition, the nutritionist could better meet Tina’s needs for managing her diabetes and losing weight. 
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Posted by Sonya Collins on May 19, 2016 11:14 AM EDT
47c84d1864ff0bf6a177754787d2de4f-huge-scA family medicine resident learns from her mentor that educating patients is the most important thing a doctor can do. 

By Patricia Martin, D.O.

My mentor recently went on maternity leave after the birth of her second child.  I quickly noticed the absence of her calming presence around our frenetic health center on the west side of Chicago.  I also noticed how in her absence I started to feel a little more overwhelmed by the day-to-day stress of our practice.  I began to reflect on how her presence and guidance had shaped my experience as a family medicine resident thus far.  She had been lighting the path for me, and when she first left, it was as though someone had abruptly turned off the light. 

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Posted by Sonya Collins on May 12, 2016 11:17 AM EDT
Emina headshotToday on the blog we begin our celebration of National Nurses Week: May 6-12, 2016. PCP’s Advocacy and Leadership Fellow Emina Bayomy, also a nurse, recalls a clinical experience in her training that showed her the true value of interprofessionalism and the vital ways her profession interacts with the entire health care team.  

By Emina Bayomy

During my experience in nursing school, interprofessionalism was something we were taught in our courses and strived for in our clinical experiences. I was empowered to feel like I was an integral member of the health care team. Unfortunately, as a student it is easy to doubt your abilities due to inexperience. Consequently, you might fail to seek out opportunities to collaborate. It is much easier to be siloed in your own profession’s work. more...
Posted by Nate Leskovic on May 5, 2016 10:35 AM EDT
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Dear Penny, You give us another wake-up call. Boundaries can get loose and good habits can get worn down in the nursing home. As you say, the way that things get paid for affects the doctor-patient relationship. In my HMO, there are financial incentives to keep our patients at home. And some of our patients who need long-term care but still value the sociali...
It is a great article to know what patients want. Each medical professional must read this to know more about patients and keep them happy.
This looks intresting one and thanks for sharing. Any decision patient only input ant output important.
Thank you for sharing such ideas...
Thanks for the full summary of events and new leadership directions we need to take in primary care. Student and resident leadership is vital to the future of primary care, especially Family Medicine, where many of our senior leaders are shifting into health system, regional, state and federal roles, thus creating large need for new and emerging leader...

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