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Archive for April, 2016
9d0c66ef9744f9af71c679f3de252cd9-huge-imApril is Occupational Therapy Month, so we invited a few occupational therapists -- including past members of our Hotspotting Learning Collaborative -- to tell us just what occupational therapists do and what that has to do with primary care. Here's what they had to say.

By David Goldstein, Jillian Fader, and Sherry Muir, PhD, OTR/L

April is occupational therapy month, but what’s occupational therapy?

Many of you probably know that occupational therapy is a health care profession that focuses on rehabilitating individuals who have physical impairments and need to regain the ability to complete daily tasks and manage basic needs. Or perhaps, you also know that occupational therapists help children with disabilities in the school system gain the skills needed to participate in school and play.

This is all true, but occupational therapy has a much wider scope than most health care professionals realize.

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Apr 28, 2016 10:43 AM EDT
25e1a3cb22e651c634b769ac0b9f8880-huge-e7For the next few weeks, Progress Notes will take a look at team-based care. What do providers think about it? How do patients feel about it? In this post from our archives, a doctor explains how patient engagement is crucial to the success of team-based care.

By Sarah Smithson, M.D.

Last week, I had a follow-up visit with one of my most energetic patients. She has truly embraced our new medical practice, Carolina Advanced Health, a patient-centered medical home that emphasizes prevention and management of chronic diseases through a multidisciplinary team-based approach. With the help of our nutritionist, in the last six months she has shed over ten pounds from her petite frame through changes in her nutrition and exercise. Her blood pressure, once borderline, is now within goal. The same is true of her blood sugar and cholesterol – her LDL dropped over 50 points without medication. Her energy fills the exam room, and she is eager to help other patients share in her success. We brainstorm together.
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Posted by Sonya Collins on Apr 21, 2016 1:59 PM EDT
5da32ab51a2430ab7a2740b0f60d7890-huge-m_For the next few weeks, Progress Notes will take a look at team-based care. What do providers think about it? How do patients feel about it? Today we hear from a doc who says clinical innovation and team-based care could dramatically change the answer to the most common patient question: When do I need to come back to see you? We not only need means of reimbursement for these models; we need to train the next generation of health care professionals to practice in these models. This post first appeared on Progress Notes in 2013 after it was published on Colorado Coalition for the Medically Underserved's blog.

By Mark Earnest, M.D., Ph.D.

“When do I need to come back and see you?”  Jane asks.

Her simple question is probably the most common question a doctor has to answer.  It comes up in literally every patient encounter. She asked it as we finished discussing the possible side effect of the new medication she will start to control her blood pressure. Like most doctors, I devoted little thought to her query and answered according to my habit and training, but her question deserves a lot more thought. How doctors like me answer this question may be the key to improving access to care and solving the looming doctor shortage. more...
Posted by Sonya Collins on Apr 14, 2016 11:36 AM EDT
6df1d7795e6b2c8f89f56831c56a914a-huge-brIt's National Public Health Week. In his editorial that originally appeared on The Huffington Post, Brian Castrucci explains why team-based care must include the public health department if it is to address social determinants of health.

By Brian Castrucci

There is increasing talk about moving "upstream" – working to prevent disease before it happens by addressing the social and environmental determinants of health – to improve health and reduce costs.

Among the champions of this approach is Rishi Manchanda, M.D. In his TED book, The Upstream Doctors, Manchanda argues for more "upstreamists" -- physicians who see their work as including a "duty not only to prescribe a clinical remedy but to tackle sickness at its source."

As an example, Manchanda recounts the story of a patient, Veronica, who suffered from severe chronic headaches. Her interaction with the health care system had resulted in inconclusive medical tests and an expensive visit to the emergency room, but no answers as to the cause of her headaches, let alone a solution.

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Posted by Sonya Collins on Apr 6, 2016 11:10 PM EDT
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Most Recent Comments

You are doing really a nice job guys. Health is the most important segment of our life without it everything has no meaning. The usage of medication ought to depend on an all-inclusive psychiatric evaluation and be one part of an extensive treatment program. It's a medical emergency and immediate expert assistance is crucial! The usage of drugs and surgi...
Dear Penny, You give us another wake-up call. Boundaries can get loose and good habits can get worn down in the nursing home. As you say, the way that things get paid for affects the doctor-patient relationship. In my HMO, there are financial incentives to keep our patients at home. And some of our patients who need long-term care but still value the sociali...
It is a great article to know what patients want. Each medical professional must read this to know more about patients and keep them happy.
This looks intresting one and thanks for sharing. Any decision patient only input ant output important.
Thank you for sharing such ideas...

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